Episode 113

Zombie Cliché Lookout:
On their own, zombies aren’t that big of a deal. They’re slow, uncoordinated, and fairly easy to avoid or destroy. People tend to run into problems when multiple zombies show up, especially in closer quarters. If the zombies don’t overwhelm you with numbers or wear you down over time, they’ll probably just get lucky and bite you when you’re not paying enough attention. It’s pretty easy to lose track of a single zombie when you’re worrying about ten others, especially when exhaustion and long-term stress are present. That’s when things tend to get tragic.

21 Comments

Dave

@ LB
I was pretty thrilled about that. You lose the grime on his face, but that’s a decent trade-off for a perplexed/quizzical look if you ask me.

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BrickVoid

This of course brings up the question of whether the cop will get eaten alive – or is that eaten undead? 😀

With two zombies and one dead (undead?) doctor on the floor, in order to defend the nurse that cop better hope he has that spare magazine clip on him, because he’s going to need it, at least until he turns!

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the dude person

One of the logistical problems I’ve always had with zombies is – if they eat their victims brains, and the way to stop a zombie is to destroy its brain, how are more zombies created? I suppose it must be that the weak are eaten, but the strong who get away become the next generation of zombies. Sort of an ironic distortion of “survival of the fittest.”

Of course, they ARE mindless zombies, so I guess they’ll just attack everything, whether they intend to eat it or not.

Anyway nice episode! I really like how the zombie in the last panel is crooked, like he’s shambling over to them. I’m anxious to see what happens next.

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Dave

Interesting bit of zombie history: the whole “braaaains” thing originated in the “Return of the Living Dead” series, which is half-comedy. The generally accepted zombie canon is that zeds eat flesh, not brains. I mean, they’d eat brains, but that’s not they’re driving force.

Thanks!

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Silver Fox

I don’t know if it’s the readers perspective I’ve got here or not.. but I’d have started the running away last page and not have waited around to see a second Zombie arise and of course, a third waiting to rise up on the floor and for whenever the poor cop finally turns. That nurse should run.

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Dave

It’s amazing how comforting groups are in bad situations. I think most people are reluctant to leave them, even if they are putting themselves in further danger.

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zombies! :)

I agree silver fox. I would’ve ran out the door and went to the police. For some strange reason. Of course they won’t believe me but if they don’t than I’ll go home and get a weapon

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Dave

One has to remember that this is a zombie story, and characters in zombie stories don’t know anything about zombies.

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Nekrospike

At this point the cop could be piecing the bites and the reanimation together, once he realises he’s next he should tell the nurse to run and try to hold the zombies off before the last second and pull the trigger. But really the thought of dying scares the crap out of most people, and to actually kill yourself you have to have something really wrong with you. Also the idea of 2 possibly 3 zombies trying to rip you to pieces whilst you let the nurse leg it? …That might be worse

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Dave

He certainly could be. I don’t give this guy too much credit for figuring things out though. He’s a purely emotionally driven character.

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Silver Fox

And as someone who does play role-playing games, there’s a perspective that happens when 1) you’re one of the players and you can see what’s coming – stay in character and pretend your character won’t know or metagame a fine line point there, figure out what’s going on and react. 2) When you are the ST/DM, it’s frustrating to see players/characters just not figure things out… they could or should, but don’t and another fine line that comes of yes the players are smart, they play their characters smart and they won’t go down the dark alley to the call of adventure, they’ll be smart and figure things out, so it’s harder to throw things at them. So it’s good to figure things out, but the fun of a story is characters going through mishaps, misadventures… and if they constantly figure things out all the time and don’t do anything or react in a matter, you can’t get a good story. Does that even make sense?

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Nikolai

Next line: “Say, Johnny, remember that time we went and patrolled the highway? Gewd times, gewd times…”

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